When is a Child Ready for a Social Skills Group?

Social skills should always be an integral part of any good ABA program right from the start. By social skills, I don’t just mean being able to play with other kids. In typical development, socializing starts very early – a baby making eye contact with his mother, a toddler pointing out an interesting sight to Read more about When is a Child Ready for a Social Skills Group?[…]

5 Steps to Teaching Play Skills

So often, we take for granted that kids like to play.  We buy them toys, arrange play dates, and even take them to parks and public areas, all in the name of playing.  No one doubts the importance of play on a child’s development.  It builds confidence, social skills, creativity, and imagination. But what happens Read more about 5 Steps to Teaching Play Skills[…]

How to Use ABA to Teach Social Skills

Social skills is a common area that we tackle within an ABA program.  Why is ABA the right approach to use when teaching social skills?  Because in an ABA program we use behavioural objectives that are: Very specific in their content. For example, a goal might be “reciprocates greetings from peers” and not “greetings” Definable Read more about How to Use ABA to Teach Social Skills[…]

Can Conversation Be Scripted?

We LOVE using visuals. Pictures make stories interesting and visual schedules give kids predictability and control.  We also use these visuals in the form of scripts to teach conversation.  You might be wondering, “But conversation has to be natural and fluid.  Doesn’t it defeat the purpose if it’s scripted?”  Our answer (and the answer of Read more about Can Conversation Be Scripted?[…]

6 Ways To Help Your Child Make Friends

When you pick up Patty from school or daycare, you always find her alone spinning toys and humming to herself. She seems happy by the situation but you’re not – you’d prefer that Patty would participate with peers. You wish that she could make friends and have fun playing with them. In general, that’s hard for kiddos with autism. However, with coaching and teaching, Patty can become more comfy relating in social situations! Here’s how you can help your honey make friends. […]

Play is a Child’s Work

play Playing dress up, tea party, soccer and Hide-and-Seek is as easy as breathing for neurotypical kids. They innately know what to do and nothing makes them happier than games with their friends. That’s not the case for children with autism. For them, playing, especially with pals, isn’t second nature; it’s actually kind of foreign. What’s a parent to do? Teach your child with autism to play! It’s a fun job and an important one, because play has a lot of developmental benefits. For example, it builds social skills, joint attention, communication, imitation, problem-solving and turn-taking. To get your honey sweet on the idea of interacting playfully with you – and, later on, other kids – follow the steps below. […]