How To Foster Independence Skills

Parents all have goals about what they’d like their kids to do and have in adulthood. Perhaps they imagine their daughter as an esteemed marine biologist who writes books and owns estates around the world. Or maybe their goal for their son, who has special needs, is to live in a nice home with friends or by himself and have a job he really enjoys. It is our job to help set our students and families up for success in the future.  In order to do this, we need to start grooming their independence skills when they are young. We want to help ensure that our clients will be proficient at taking care of themselves to the best of their abilities by the time they are grown up and ready to leave home.

Once a student is a pro with beginner’s self-care tasks, incrementally delve into the more advanced targets that follow. If your kiddo struggles with learning life skills, then be sure to employ the recommended teaching tools and tips. […]

How To Teach A Young Child Self Care Skills

  In the first year of children’s lives, they rely on their parents and caregivers for everything. As children approach 2 years of age, however, the journey towards independence should start with teaching them how to do simple self care tasks, such as using the potty and taking off their hats. We encourage starting to Read more about How To Teach A Young Child Self Care Skills[…]

When is a Child Ready for Toilet Training?

Successful toilet training is one of the most useful and (likely) socially significant skills we can teach our clients. When a child is ready for toilet training, we often have to put other programming aside in order to accomplish this goal – and that’s okay! This is a life skill that is important to the Read more about When is a Child Ready for Toilet Training?[…]

How to Teach Students to Use Visual Schedules

If you’ve been with us long enough, you know how we feel about visuals. They are in important part of teaching new skills and for promoting independence: https://howtoaba.com/importance-visuals/ Using a visual schedule helps to provide predictability and routine in lots of situations. Teaching a child to follow a visual schedule is a skill that will Read more about How to Teach Students to Use Visual Schedules[…]

Parent Training

Generalization is an important part of programming because it allows for us to extend our reach beyond the actual ABA sessions and into the child’s everyday life. Parents are usually the ones that play a large part in this generalization. This means that we, as ABA professionals, need to be aware of how we’re training Read more about Parent Training[…]

6 ABA Strategies I Use in My Home (And Why a Reinforcement System Isn’t One of Them!)

Balancing My Roles of “Behaviour Analyst” and “Mom” The two roles of “Behaviour Analyst” and “Mom” can sometimes be difficult to merge.  On the one hand, knowing so much about the principles of behaviour, I should have all the tools I need to manage behaviour in my home.  You would think that my home is Read more about 6 ABA Strategies I Use in My Home (And Why a Reinforcement System Isn’t One of Them!)[…]

Daily Activities To Promote Language

My 5-year-old daughter just finished telling me about her adventure at the Science Centre, leaving no detail out. She’s a chatterbox! My hubby and I love listening to her, especially because she was tight-lipped until she was close to three.

To promote language in our late talker, I used communication temptations and labeled everything we saw and every action we did during our daily activities. It’s important for us to clearly and slowly model words for our little loves, because listening to us helps them develop language.

There’s a lot you can do to help your sweetie speak, too. Cross-my-heart, it’s not too much work and definitely worth the effort. Here are a few examples of what you can do to promote language in your quiet kiddo. […]

6 Ways To Help Your Child Make Friends

When you pick up Patty from school or daycare, you always find her alone spinning toys and humming to herself. She seems happy by the situation but you’re not – you’d prefer that Patty would participate with peers. You wish that she could make friends and have fun playing with them. In general, that’s hard for kiddos with autism. However, with coaching and teaching, Patty can become more comfy relating in social situations! Here’s how you can help your honey make friends. […]

Look At Me: How To Encourage Eye Contact

Loving mother looking at her daughterTalking face-to-face, your child with autism doesn’t look at you. Her eyes have never intentionally met yours. It’s hurtful sometimes – it would feel so connective if she’d gaze at you when you said I love you – and at other times it comes across as rude. It’s not her fault and it’s not yours. Many people on the spectrum struggle with eye contact, finding it uncomfortable or, for some, extremely stressful. Given that eye contact doesn’t come naturally to kiddos with ASD, should you encourage Penny to peek into your peepers? We think so. […]